A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

©Jürgen Grünwald, F1 photo studio

A Villa in Natternbach

A Villa in Natternbach

A Villa in Natternbach

A Villa in Natternbach

A Villa in Natternbach

A Villa in Natternbach

Location: Natternbach, Austria

Architect: Tp3 Architects

Material: Concrete

Completion date: 2018

Built area: 145m2

Studio: Tp3 Architekten

Team: A. Henter , M. Rabengruber

Site Supervision: Hofberg 10/2, AT-4020 Linz

Solicitation of Quotations: Ziviltechnikerbüro Pickart, Lavendelweg 12, AT-4242 Hirschbach

HVACR (Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration): Meissl GmbH & Co.KG, Passauerstraße 20, AT-4722 Peuerbach

Electrical Engineering: Hr. Hubert Dobrezberger, Hasledt 34, AT-4724 Eschenau

Construction Company: Duswald Bau GmbH & Co.KG

Photographer: Jürgen Grünwald and F1 photo studio

Story:

Text provided by the architect:

Functionality, economy and simple aesthetics are the main focal points of the design.

 

A glance at the site plan reveals an unusual cubature—a very narrow and very elongated structure.

 

A 35-metre-long detached house rests on the northern plot boundary and opens up to the south, following the slope of the hillside. The slender shape of the building is due, on the one hand, to the shape of the plot and, on the other, to its orientation to the cardinal directions. The result is a simple building form (within a multi-layered, surrounding building structure) that responds clearly to the plot and the surroundings, while the interior grows out of the desire for peace and security.
The surroundings are characterised by a few detached houses loosely scattered in the landscape, framed by the adjacent natural space. Surrounded by this landscape, the house combines idyllic living with contemporary architecture, creating an ideal "home".
From a town-planning perspective, the building is situated as closely as possible to the residential street, seemingly merging the familiar image of the main house, side room and garage.
Generous window openings offer plenty of space for light and air, allowing inside and outside to flow into one another and providing a wonderful view of the surrounding natural space. The façade, the deliberately placed window openings and the choice of materials give this simple building an unmistakable character.

 

Designing a building is actually child's play and doesn't take much time; anyone can do it. The challenge begins when you think about the people who will live in this building. 
DAVID CHIPPERFIELD

 

The internal spatial sequence develops along an elongated connecting zone, which also forms the backbone of the south-facing living areas. From the garage to the sheltered outdoor area, all features of the rooms are accessed via this internal route axis.
The kitchen provides direct access to the sheltered outdoor terrace, which offers an uninterrupted view of the landscape. The entire ground floor is flanked by a terrace, pool level and access to the garden. This stepped terrace landscape leads to an "extension" of the living space, blurring the boundary between inside and outside and turning the terrace and garden into an outdoor living space.

 

Simple and rather restrained on the outside, the interior is dominated by wood, a natural building material, which creates a special sense of space through its feel and craftsmanship.

 

 

The overall construction of the building (especially from the street side) gives the house a very reduced and at the same time "hard" appearance from the outside, but with the timber-clad façade elements and the rather rough façade plaster, it displays a strong and desired contrast between protection and cosiness.


Not only the cardinal directions, but also all the orientation of the views and visual relationships were decisive for the design.


The two-storey building, developed in line with the steep slope, is divided into an upper entrance and living area at street level and a sleeping level below with direct access to the garden. However, due to the existing difference in grade, the building (on the street side) appears to be a single-storey house.
One of the most important challenges was the question of visual screening for the private living spaces as well as the pool and terrace area. The side rooms were therefore arranged on the street side in the area of the pool landscape, which, together with the vertical wooden slats, create a protected and intimate outdoor area.
The floor plan structure is clear, simple and meets the desired living requirements, structured within a "classic" room arrangement: some of the utility rooms face the street, while the living rooms and bedrooms are oriented towards the garden.

 

Sustainable building
As architects, we have a responsibility towards future generations. With this in mind, we are committed to ensuring that buildings can last for decades and be used flexibly, while they are constructed in such a way that they can be returned to the natural cycle. This is why the choice of materials and construction methods used is an important part of our design process.

 

The building was constructed using a classic mixed-construction method. Solid construction was used for the basement, which was supplemented by timber construction in the ground floor. The solid construction was realised with insulated bricks, so that conventional façade insulation was not needed. In order to ensure the appearance of old plaster structures, the entire façade plaster was "thrown up by hand" and levelled very roughly (that is, almost like in the old days :- ).

The building is equipped with an indoor air heat pump and controlled ventilation with heat recovery.

 

 

SUPPLIERS

Timber Framer: Tolleterau 230, AT-4710 Grieskirchen

Slater, Tinner: Dachtech GmbH, Weberstraße 5, AT-4053 Ansfelden

Plumber: Meissl GmbH & Co.KG, Passauerstraße 20, AT-4722 Peuerbach

Electrician: Hr. Hubert Dobrezberger, Hasledt 34, AT-4724 Eschenau

Windows, Shading: Josko Center Andorf, Josko-Straße 3, AT-4770 Andorf 

Front Door, Internal Door: Josko Center Andorf, Josko-Straße 3, AT-4770 Andorf

Floor Screed: Hadis Bau Linz, Unionstraße 5a, AT-4020 Linz            

Metalworker: Redoit-Montagen GmbH, Moosbachweg 5, AT-4723 Natternbach

Carpenter, Furnishing: Schwingenschuh GmbH, Tischlerstraße 2, AT-4542 Nußbach

Pooltechnic: Mittermüller Schwimmbadtechnik GmbH, Bergweg 2, AT-4202 Hellmonsödt

Excavation: Hr. Norbert Haderer, Ed 1, AT-4723 Natterbach

 

 

 

 

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